About Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is a type of cancer where cells in the breast tissue divide and grow without normal control. It is a widespread and random disease, striking women and men of all ages and races.

In a healthy body, natural systems control the creation, growth and death of cells. Cancer occurs when these systems don’t work right and cells don’t die at the normal rate. So, there’s more cell growth than cell death. This excess growth can form a tumor.

Breast cancer occurs when cells in the breast divide and grow without their normal control. Tumors in the breast tend to grow slowly. By the time a lump is large enough to feel, it may have been growing for as long as 10 years. Some tumors are aggressive and grow much faster.

Between 50-75 percent of breast cancers begin in the milk ducts, about 10-15 percent begin in the lobules and a few begin in other breast tissues.

In 2017, it’s estimated that among U.S. women there will be

  • 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer
  • 40,610 breast cancer deaths

In 2017, it’s estimated that among U.S. men  there will be

  • 2,470 new cases of invasive breast cancer
  • 460 breast cancer deaths

The exact cause of the disease is unknown, and at this time, there is no cure.

But there is hope. Thanks to heightened awareness, early detection through screening, improved treatment methods and increased access to breast health services, people have a greater chance of survival than ever before.

The Susan G. Komen® national website, www.komen.org, offers comprehensive information about breast cancer risk factors, early detection and screening, diagnosis and treatment. Developed in conjunction with the Harvard School of Public Health, the site offers a one-stop resource for all the latest information on the disease.

For more breast cancer resources or if you have any questions, please contact our office at (310) 575-3011